hi, my name is kira
not worth describing.

leslieseuffert:

Armin BlasbichlerT III, 2009 [Inception Door] - 585 mounted diapositives of Pantone swatches, laminated glass, wood frame | H 211cm, W 97cm

19 minutes ago with 1,682 notes
sunshinychick:

futurescope:

Solar energy that doesn’t block the view

A team of researchers at Michigan State University has developed a new type of solar concentrator that when placed over a window creates solar energy while allowing people to actually see through the window. It is called a transparent luminescent solar concentrator and can be used on buildings, cell phones and any other device that has a clear surface. And, according to Richard Lunt of MSU’s College of Engineering, the key word is “transparent.”

[read more at MSU] [paper] [picture credit: Yimu Zhao]

sunshinychick:

futurescope:

Solar energy that doesn’t block the view

A team of researchers at Michigan State University has developed a new type of solar concentrator that when placed over a window creates solar energy while allowing people to actually see through the window. It is called a transparent luminescent solar concentrator and can be used on buildings, cell phones and any other device that has a clear surface. And, according to Richard Lunt of MSU’s College of Engineering, the key word is “transparent.”

[read more at MSU] [paper] [picture credit: Yimu Zhao]

image

57 minutes ago with 151,645 notes

Why is it that people are willing to spend $20 on a bowl of pasta with sauce that they might actually be able to replicate pretty faithfully at home, yet they balk at the notion of a white-table cloth Thai restaurant, or a tacos that cost more than $3 each? Even in a city as “cosmopolitan” as New York, restaurant openings like Tamarind Tribeca (Indian) and Lotus of Siam (Thai) always seem to elicit this knee-jerk reaction from some diners who have decided that certain countries produce food that belongs in the “cheap eats” category—and it’s not allowed out. (Side note: How often do magazine lists of “cheap eats” double as rundowns of outer-borough ethnic foods?)

Yelp, Chowhound, and other restaurant sites are littered with comments like, “$5 for dumplings?? I’ll go to Flushing, thanks!” or “When I was backpacking in India this dish cost like five cents, only an idiot would pay that much!” Yet you never see complaints about the prices at Western restaurants framed in these terms, because it’s ingrained in people’s heads that these foods are somehow “worth” more. If we’re talking foie gras or chateaubriand, fair enough. But be real: You know damn well that rigatoni sorrentino is no more expensive to produce than a plate of duck laab, so to decry a pricey version as a ripoff is disingenuous. This question of perceived value is becoming increasingly troublesome as more non-native (read: white) chefs take on “ethnic” cuisines, and suddenly it’s okay to charge $14 for shu mai because hey, the chef is ELEVATING the cuisine.

One of the entries from the list ‘20 Things Everyone Thinks About the Food World (But Nobody Will Say)’. (via crankyskirt)
1 hour ago with 18,748 notes
2 hours ago with 2,428 notes
stoker 

kingdomy:

Shiba Inu “works” at a little shop in Japan (via)

gnarly:

when the red light just turns green and somebody is already beepin at you

image

3 hours ago with 94,712 notes
4 hours ago with 4,257 notes

art-of-swords:

Kindjal Dagger

  • Dating: circa 1800
  • Culture: Caucasian
  • Measurements: overall length 55 cm

The dagger has a wide, straight, double-edged blade with deep, asymmetrical grooves, featuring golden decorations for the first part of the blade. At the forte there’s cartouche with inscriptions. The dagger has the typical grip with wooden grip scales featuring gold-inlaid iron mounts.

4 hours ago with 2,578 notes
weaponry 

Adesuwa Pariyapasat by Jason Jean for Citizen Couture.

Adesuwa Pariyapasat by Jason Jean for Citizen Couture.

fashionsambapita:

Read each story here:http://vogue.cm/XSNWEq
10 hours ago with 4,208 notes
afropunk 
TINY